Jaylen Brown, Enes Kanter helping Tacko Fall learn how to swim — The Rookie Wire

Brown and Kanter were captured on video helping Fall learn how to swim on Monday at the Walt Disney World Resort.

Jaylen Brown, Enes Kanter helping Tacko Fall learn how to swim — The Rookie Wire

Cody Taylor August 31, 2020 5:37 pm00:00 of 01:48Volume 0%00:0301:48 Hide video

After posting a 112-94 win over the Toronto Raptors in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals on Sunday, some Boston Celtics players spent their day off on Monday in the pool for some fun and extra work.

Jaylen Brown and Enes Kanter were captured on video helping Tacko Fall to learn how to swim. The rookie has previously said in the past that he does not know how to swim and previously took part in lessons at the Boys & Girls Club in Boston.

Fall said he grew up near a beach in Senegal but never went to the water much. However, Fall has, like most players, participated in aquatic exercises, and given his 7-foot-5 frame, he can stand up in most pools so learning how to swim likely hasn’t been a priority.

Tacko Swim Class 🌮😄

Senegalese Phelps 🇸🇳 🏊🏽‍♂️ pic.twitter.com/BjiwnF21ZB

— Enes Kanter (@EnesKanter) August 31, 2020

The Celtics have often done several activities together during their time at the Walt Disney World Resort. The group has previously hit the golf course together and they have also taken bike rides around the bubble and other related things.

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Enes Kanter caught Tacko Fall napping on the Celtics’ team bus

Steph Curry says he’ll likely kneel for national anthem next season — Times-Herald

Curry said he stands in solidarity with his fellow NBA players who have knelt and spoken extensively about racial justice in the Orlando bubble.

Steph Curry says he’ll likely kneel for national anthem next season — Times-Herald

George Hill planned to sit out solo, then other Bucks and NBA teams joined — ProBasketballTalk | NBC Sports

George Hill – playing for the Bucks in the bubble when police shot Jacob Blake in the back seven times – said, “We shouldn’t have came to this damn place.”

George Hill planned to sit out solo, then other Bucks and NBA teams joined — ProBasketballTalk | NBC Sports

George Hill – playing for the Bucks in the bubble when police shot Jacob Blake in the back seven times – said, “We shouldn’t have came to this damn place.”

Two days later, the entire NBA was on strike.

How did players reach that point? There was talk of players boycotting the league’s resumption at Disney World before it began. But 98% of players on continuing teams reported to the bubble. Of players who chose not to play, none cited social justice as their primary reason.

Did so many players really change their position on playing? Not exactly.

It took only one.

Hill decided to sit out Bucks-Magic Game 5.

Tim Bontemps of ESPN:

Hill said that, outside of a conversation with Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer before the game, no one on his team was aware of what he was going to do until they found out he was inactive about 20 minutes before tipoff.

“I didn’t want to put that pressure on my teammates,” Hill said. “I didn’t want them to have to make that decision unless they wanted to. So as a teammate, I didn’t take it to them. That may be a little bit my fault on my part to not take it to them. But I didn’t want them to make a decision out of pressure, and because we have a good relationship.

“So before the game, guys were trying to figure out why I wasn’t playing. And we spoke about it. Sterling [Brown] spoke about it and wanted to stay in with us. And it was a trickle effect; every guy in our locker room stood by my side and said, ‘If my brother isn’t playing, then we aren’t playing.’ And we made that decision.

The “trickle effect” continued from there.

The Bucks reportedly intended only to forfeit Game 5 – not prompt an NBA-wide strike. But players on other teams didn’t know Milwaukee’s plan and followed in not playing. Suddenly, the entire league was on strike.

Incredible!

NBA players have too often prioritized unity, which has led to everyone rallying around the least-offensive gestures. But Hill didn’t wait to see whether everyone else agreed. He did what he thought was best for him. And one he made that leap, everyone followed.

The Bucks drew major attention to their specific demands – justice for Jacob Blake and the Wisconsin State Legislature addressing police accountability, police brutality and criminal-justice reform.

The league-wide strike was less-traditionally effective. Players agreed to play before meeting with owners. Players agreed to play before tangible gains were announced. That’s a consequence of players mostly not looking to strike in the first place.

But Hill wanted what could be described as part-mental-health day, part protest. Sterling Brown has his own personal connection to police violence. The Bucks also have excellent camaraderie.

Everything went into motion.

Though the larger strike’s direct gains have been limited, it made a loud statement on social justice. It echoed as teams and athletes in other sports sat out. And there’s seemingly no direct downside. Presumably, because NBA games were postponed rather than canceled, players won’t have their salaries reduced.

This was significant. And it can all be traced back to George Hill.

Dodgers deal Ross Stripling to Toronto at deadline — Press Telegram

LOS ANGELES >> The Dodgers shopped for starting pitching at the trade deadline — but wound up trading one instead. Right-hander Ross Stripling was traded — for the second time in seven months — to the Toronto Blue Jays this time for two players to be named later. Teams are prohibited from trading players not…

Dodgers deal Ross Stripling to Toronto at deadline — Press Telegram