Red Sox Getting Praise For Vastly Improved Farm System In 2021 — NESN.com

The Boston Red Sox committed to one of their New Year’s resolutions this year. Per rankings from MLB.com, the Red Sox had the most improved farm system in 2021 after jumping 12 spots since the preseason. The publication had Boston at No. 24 (with just six teams below) in March on its preseason list. A […]

Red Sox Getting Praise For Vastly Improved Farm System In 2021 — NESN.com

MARINERS SEE RAY OF HOPE

MARINERS SIGN LHP ROBBIE RAY TO 5-YEAR MAJOR LEAGUE CONTRACT

Ray won the American League Cy Young Award in 2021

SEATTLE, Wash. — Seattle Mariners President of Baseball Operations Jerry Dipoto announced today that the Mariners have signed left-handed pitcher Robbie Ray to a 5-year Major League contract.

Seattle’s Major League, 40-man, roster is now full at 40 players.

2021 AL CY YOUNG AWARD VOTING

Rank	Name		Pts	1st Place	Share
1	Robbie Ray	207	29	99%
2	Gerrit Cole	123	1	59%
3	Lance Lynn	48	0	23%
4	Nathan Eovaldi	41	0	20%
5	Carlos Rodón	34	0	16%
Ray, 30, won the American League Cy Young Award in 2021, receiving 29 of 30 first place votes. The 6-foot-2, 215-pound, left-hander led all qualified American League pitchers in ERA (2.84), strikeouts (248), innings pitched (193.1), games started (32), WHIP (1.045) and bWAR (6.7). He was the first pitcher to lead his league in strikeouts, WHIP and ERA since Clayton Kershaw in 2013. The last AL pitcher to lead the league in all three categories was Justin Verlander in 2011.

“Adding our league’s reigning Cy Young award winner is exciting,” Dipoto said. “He’s a high character person, as well as one of the preeminent strikeout pitchers in the game. Robbie brings real presence to the front of our rotation.”

“Robbie pitched against us twice last season,” said Mariners Manager Scott Servais. “He has that dominating mound presence, paired with the kind of electric stuff you would expect from a Cy Young winner. You can feel it from the dugout. He really controls the game when he’s on the mound. His intensity is a great fit for our pitching staff and our ballclub as a whole.”

Ray tossed at least 5.0 IP in 28 of his 32 starts in 2021, on his way to racking up an American League-best 23 quality starts. He tallied 5+ strikeouts in 27 starts, including 10 outings with 10+ strikeouts. Overall, he went 13-7 with a 2.84 ERA (61 ER, 193.1 IP) with 52 walks and 248 strikeouts in 32 starts in 2021 with the Blue Jays.

“I can’t wait to get started here in Seattle. I’m here to win,” Ray said. “There’s something special going on here with the team coming off a 90-win season, and I’m excited to be a part of it. I’ve already had a chance to speak with some of the guys, and we all want to be a part of the team that brings a championship to this city. Seeing the stadium packed at the end of the season last year, and the support of this fanbase, I could not be more excited to be a Seattle Mariner.”

Ray tallied an all-time record 1,241 strikeouts through his first 1000.0 career innings pitched and is currently the all-time leader in strikeouts per nine (min. 1000 IP) with a mark of 11.2.

Ray is a veteran of 8 Major League seasons with Detroit (2014), Arizona (2015-20) and Toronto (2020-21). He was originally drafted by the Nationals in the 12th round of the 2010 MLB First-Year Player Draft out of Brentwood High School in Brentwood, TN. He made his Major League debut with the Tigers on May 6, 2014 vs. Houston. Overall, he is 62-58 with a 4.00 ERA (460 ER, 1035.2 IP) with 453 walks and 1290 strikeouts in 193 career games (189 starts). He was selected to the National League All-Star Team in 2017.

Ray has made 3 postseason appearances, pitching in the AL Wild Card Game in 2017 & 2020, and the ALDS in 2017.

Robbie and his wife Taylor have three children: sons, Asher and Brady, and daughter, Leighton.

Hoornstra: Tying MLB player salaries to performance an idea worth revisiting — Orange County Register

Besides paying taxes and various acts of war, playing baseball might be the most well-chronicled activity in human history. If something took place in a professional baseball contest since 1900, there is a better than average chance it has been recorded for perpetuity. The maintenance of these records has continued unabated. The bigger question is…

Hoornstra: Tying MLB player salaries to performance an idea worth revisiting — Orange County Register

Jays claim RHP Anderson from Padres; add four to 40-man roster

BLUE JAYS ROSTER MOVES

Zach Logue

The Toronto Blue Jays have claimed RHP Shaun Anderson off waivers from the San Diego Padres.  

Additionally, RHP Hagen DannerRHP Bowden FrancisINF Leo Jimenez, and LHP Zach Logue have been added to the 40-man roster.  

Anderson, 27, pitched in 16 games while splitting his 2021 campaign between Minnesota, Baltimore, and San Diego. The 6-4, 228 lb. right-hander held an 8.49 ERA and recorded 19 strikeouts across 23.1 innings of work. The Coral Springs, FL, native was selected by the Boston Red Sox in the third round of the 2016 First-Year Player Draft from the University of Florida and has gone 3-5 with a career 5.75 ERA over three Major League seasons.

Twins protect six from Rule 5 draft; Willians Astudillo among those removed from 40-man roster — Twin Cities

The Twins added six players to their 40-man roster on Friday, the last day to shield prospects ahead of the Rule 5 Draft, which is scheduled for next month. Top prospect Royce Lewis, a shortstop, as well as fellow infielder Jose Miranda and four pitchers — Josh Winder, Blayne Enlow, Cole Sands and Chris Vallimont…

Twins protect six from Rule 5 draft; Willians Astudillo among those removed from 40-man roster — Twin Cities

Belt accepts qualifying offer; 13 decline

One Player Accepts Qualifying Offer; 13 Players Decline

NEW YORK, Nov. 17 – The following 14playershave reached decisions on their Club’s Qualifying Offer:

ACCEPTED:

Brandon Belt (San Francisco Giants)

DECLINED:

Nick Castellanos (Cincinnati Reds)

Michael Conforto (New York Mets)

Carlos Correa (Houston Astros)

Freddie Freeman (Atlanta Braves)

Raisel Iglesias (Los Angeles Angels)

Robbie Ray (Toronto Blue Jays)

Eduardo Rodríguez (Boston Red Sox)

Corey Seager (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Marcus Semien (Toronto Blue Jays)

Trevor Story (Colorado Rockies)

Noah Syndergaard (New York Mets)

Chris Taylor (Los Angeles Dodgers)

Justin Verlander (Houston Astros)

—30—

Breaking: SF Giants extend manager Gabe Kapler’s contract — Red Bluff Daily News

The Giants rewarded manager Gabe Kapler with a contract extension on Friday after a season that saw San Francisco defy all projections and win the NL West with a franchise-record 107 victories. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed, but the extension goes through the 2024 season. Kapler, 46, in two seasons has guided the…

Breaking: SF Giants extend manager Gabe Kapler’s contract — Red Bluff Daily News

MLB FREE AGENT LIST

Complete List of 2021 XX(B) Free Agents

NEW YORK, Nov. 8 – The 188 players listed below make up the final list of 2021 XX(B) free agents.

Arizona Diamondbacks (2): Kole Calhoun, Tyler Clippard

Atlanta Braves (10): Ehire Adrianza, Jesse Chavez, Adam Duvall, Freddie Freeman, Christopher Martin, Joc Pederson, Eddie Rosario, Drew Smyly, Jorge Soler, Josh Tomlin

Baltimore Orioles (2): Fernando Abad, Matt Harvey

Boston Red Sox (8): Adam Ottavino, Martín Pérez, Garrett Richards, Hansel Robles, Eduardo Rodriguez, Daniel Santana, Kyle Schwarber, Travis Shaw

Chicago Cubs (5): Robinson Chirinos, Zachary Davies, Matt Duffy, Jose Lobaton, Austin Romine

Chicago White Sox (5): Leury García, Billy Hamilton, César Hernández, Carlos Rodon, Ryan Tepera

Cincinnati Reds (4): Asdrúbal Cabrera, Nick Castellanos, Mychal Givens, Michael Lorenzen

Cleveland Indians (4): Blake Parker, Roberto Pérez, Wilson Ramos, Bryan Shaw

Colorado Rockies (4): Jhoulys Chacín, Jonathan Gray, Chris Owings, Trevor Story

Detroit Tigers (4): Derek Holland, Wily Peralta, Julio Teheran, José Ureña

Houston Astros (7): Carlos Correa, Yimi García, Marwin Gonzalez, Kendall Graveman, Zack Greinke, Brooks Raley, Justin Verlander

Kansas City Royals (4): Wade Davis, Jesse Hahn, Greg Holland, Ervin Santana 

Los Angeles Angels (8): Dylan Bundy, Steven Cishek, Alexander Cobb, Dexter Fowler, Raisel Iglesias, Juan Lagares, Alejandro Ramos, Kurt Suzuki

Los Angeles Dodgers (12): Danny Duffy, Cole Hamels, Kenley Jansen, Joe Kelly, Clayton Kershaw, Corey Knebel, Jimmy Nelson, Albert Pujols, Max Scherzer, Corey Seager, Steven Souza, Chris Taylor

Miami Marlins (1): Sandy León

Milwaukee Brewers (9): Brett Anderson, John Axford, Bradley Boxberger, Eduardo Escobar, Avisaíl García, Daniel Norris, Manny Piña, Colin Rea, Hunter Strickland

Minnesota Twins (3): Alex Colomé, Michael Pineda, Andrelton Simmons

New York Mets (12): Javier Báez, Dellin Betances, Michael Conforto, Jeurys Familia, Brad Hand, Heath Hembree, Richard Hill, Aaron Loup, Kevin Pillar, Marcus Stroman, Noah Syndergaard, Jonathan Villar

New York Yankees (5): Brett Gardner, Corey Kluber, Darren O’Day, Anthony Rizzo, Joely Rodríguez

Oakland A’s (13): Mark Canha, Andrew Chafin, Khristopher Davis, Jake Diekman, Michael Fiers, Yan Gomes, Joshua Harrison, Jed Lowrie, Starling Marte, Mitchell Moreland, Yusmeiro Petit, Sergio Romo, Trevor Rosenthal

Philadelphia Phillies (8): Cam Bedrosian, Archie Bradley, Freddy Galvis, Ian Kennedy, Andrew McCutchen, Bradley Miller, Matthew Moore, Héctor Neris

Pittsburgh Pirates (3): Trevor Cahill, Shelby Miller, Yoshitomo Tsutsugo

St. Louis Cardinals (9): Matt Carpenter, Luis Amado García, J.A. Happ, Kwang Hyun Kim, Wade LeBlanc, Jonathan Lester, Carlos Martínez, TJ McFarland, Andrew Miller

San Diego Padres (6): Ross Detwiler, Daniel Hudson, Keone Kela, Jake Marisnick, Tommy Pham, Vincent Velasquez

San Francisco Giants (10): Brandon Belt, Kris Bryant, Tyler Chatwood, Johnny Cueto, Anthony DeSclafani, Kevin Gausman, Scott Kazmir, Donovan Solano, Tony Watson, Alex Wood

Seattle Mariners (7): Tyler Anderson, Sean Doolittle, Yusei Kikuchi, James Paxton, Héctor Santiago, Kyle Seager, Joe Smith

Tampa Bay Rays (7): Chris Archer, Nelson Cruz, Tommy Hunter, Collin McHugh, David Robertson, Chaz Roe, Michael Wacha

Texas Rangers (3): Charlie Culberson, Brock Holt, Jordan Lyles 

Toronto Blue Jays (8): Corey Dickerson, Jarrod Dyson, Steven Matz, David Phelps, Robbie Ray, Marcus Semien, Joakim Soria, Kirby Yates

Washington Nationals (5): Alex Avila, Luis Avilán, Jordy Mercer, Gerardo Parra, Ryan Zimmerman

Dodgers decline reliever Joe Kelly’s $12 million option — Orange County Register

LOS ANGELES — It was a $25 million pout. The Dodgers on Saturday officially declined the club option in reliever Joe Kelly’s contract, agreeing to pay him a $4 million buyout rather than a $12 million salary in 2022. Kelly becomes the Dodgers’ 12th free agent this winter joining Corey Seager, Chris Taylor, Max Scherzer,…

Dodgers decline reliever Joe Kelly’s $12 million option — Orange County Register

160 PLAYERS DECLARED FREE AGENTS — EIGHT BLUE JAYS

160 Players Become XX(B) Free Agents
NEW YORK, Nov. 3 – One hundred sixty players today were declared XX(B) free agents. Additional
players may become XX(B) free agents pending option decisions in their Uniform Player
Contracts.
Arizona Diamondbacks (0):
Atlanta Braves (7): Ehire Adrianza, Jesse Chavez, Freddie Freeman, Christopher Martin, Eddie Rosario,
Drew Smyly, Jorge Soler
Baltimore Orioles (2): Fernando Abad, Matt Harvey
Boston Red Sox (5): Adam Ottavino, Hansel Robles, Eduardo Rodriguez, Daniel Santana, Travis Shaw
Chicago Cubs (5): Robinson Chirinos, Zachary Davies, Matt Duffy, Jose Lobaton, Austin Romine
Chicago White Sox (4): Leury García, Billy Hamilton, Carlos Rodon, Ryan Tepera
Cincinnati Reds (3): Asdrúbal Cabrera, Mychal Givens, Michael Lorenzen
Cleveland Indians (3): Blake Parker, Wilson Ramos, Bryan Shaw
Colorado Rockies (4): Jhoulys Chacín, Jonathan Gray, Chris Owings, Trevor Story
Detroit Tigers (4): Derek Holland, Wily Peralta, Julio Teheran, José Ureña
Houston Astros (7): Carlos Correa, Yimi García, Marwin Gonzalez, Kendall Graveman, Zack Greinke,
Brooks Raley, Justin Verlander
Kansas City Royals (4): Wade Davis, Jesse Hahn, Greg Holland, Ervin Santana
Los Angeles Angels (8): Dylan Bundy, Steven Cishek, Alexander Cobb, Dexter Fowler, Raisel Iglesias, Juan
Lagares, Alejandro Ramos, Kurt Suzuki
Los Angeles Dodgers (11): Danny Duffy, Cole Hamels, Kenley Jansen, Clayton Kershaw, Corey Knebel,
Jimmy Nelson, Albert Pujols, Max Scherzer, Corey Seager, Steven Souza, Chris Taylor
Miami Marlins (1): Sandy León
Milwaukee Brewers (8): Brett Anderson, John Axford, Bradley Boxberger, Eduardo Escobar, Daniel
Norris, Manny Piña, Colin Rea, Hunter Strickland
Minnesota Twins (2): Michael Pineda, Andrelton Simmons
New York Mets (11): Javier Báez, Dellin Betances, Michael Conforto, Jeurys Familia, Brad Hand, Heath
Hembree, Richard Hill, Aaron Loup, Marcus Stroman, Noah Syndergaard, Jonathan Villar
New York Yankees (2): Corey Kluber, Anthony Rizzo
Oakland A’s (11): Mark Canha, Khristopher Davis, Michael Fiers, Yan Gomes, Joshua Harrison, Jed
Lowrie, Starling Marte, Mitchell Moreland, Yusmeiro Petit, Sergio Romo, Trevor Rosenthal
Philadelphia Phillies (7): Cam Bedrosian, Archie Bradley, Freddy Galvis, Ian Kennedy, Bradley Miller,
Matthew Moore, Héctor Neris
Pittsburgh Pirates (3): Trevor Cahill, Shelby Miller, Yoshitomo Tsutsugo
St. Louis Cardinals (7): Luis Amado García, J.A. Happ, Kwang Hyun Kim, Wade LeBlanc, Jonathan Lester,
TJ McFarland, Andrew Miller
San Diego Padres (4): Ross Detwiler, Daniel Hudson, Tommy Pham, Vincent Velasquez
San Francisco Giants (9): Brandon Belt, Kris Bryant, Tyler Chatwood, Anthony DesSclafani, Kevin
Gausman, Scott Kazmir, Donovan Solano, Tony Watson, Alex Wood
Seattle Mariners (5): Tyler Anderson, Sean Doolittle, James Paxton, Héctor Santiago, Joe Smith
Tampa Bay Rays (7): Chris Archer, Nelson Cruz, Tommy Hunter, Collin McHugh, David Robertson, Chaz
Roe, Michael Wacha
Texas Rangers (3): Charlie Culberson, Brock Holt, Jordan Lyles
Toronto Blue Jays (8): Corey Dickerson, Jarrod Dyson, Steven Matz, David Phelps, Robbie Ray, Marcus
Semien, Joakim Soria, Kirby Yates
Washington Nationals (5): Alex Avila, Luis Avilán, Jordy Mercer, Gerardo Parra, Ryan Zimmerman

“I don’t know. It could have backfired, I guess. I just thought at that point in time, in a game of this magnitude and all, that he had done his job. And we had a bullpen that all the guys we use had two days off, and they were only going to pitch an inning apiece, and that made them available for the next two games after if it went south.” — Brian Snitker on removing Ian Anderson after five innings.

MLB WORLD SERIES: ASTROS VS BRAVES

October 29, 2021

Brian Snitker

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Truist Park

Atlanta Braves

Postgame 3 Press Conference

Atlanta – 2, Houston – 0

Q. Brian, can you talk about what went into the decision to pull Ian when you did? Not just with the no-hitter but also against the —

BRIAN SNITKER: The no-hitter thing, he wasn’t going to pitch a nine-inning no-hitter.

Q. I was going to say also against the backdrop of two bullpen games.

BRIAN SNITKER: No, but still I’m — and I told Ian, I said, Ian, I’ll be honest with you. One of the things was he was throwing a lot of pitches in the top half of that lineup, getting ready to go back out when he did.

I thought the fourth inning he really had to work to get through that. He had a really good fifth inning. And then I told him because he was like, are you sure? Are you sure? (Laughter). But I was just like, Ian, I’m going with my gut right here. Just my eyes, my gut.

It would have been real easy to let him go out. I don’t know, something just — our guys were rested that we like, and I just thought at some point those guys had saw, I think, Altuve — their first three hitters saw multiple — had 12, 9 — I think 12 pitches that they saw off him. I was like he’s getting out of trouble, and he’s making pitches. You look up there — and he was making pitches when he had to. That’s what I said earlier today. The kid never stops pitching. He never stops trying to make pitches.

I don’t know. It could have backfired, I guess. I just thought at that point in time, in a game of this magnitude and all, that he had done his job. And we had a bullpen that all the guys we use had two days off, and they were only going to pitch an inning apiece, and that made them available for the next two games after if it went south.

Q. Were you almost relieved when they get that hit in the ninth inning after the only hit to that point was the one that falls —

BRIAN SNITKER: No, I wasn’t relieved. I wanted to catch that ball (laughter). There was no relief at all.

Q. In retrospect, I should say?

BRIAN SNITKER: No, no, no. I was like, oh, my God, now they’re bringing — no, I wasn’t relieved after that.

(Laughter).

Q. What can you say about Ian, what he’s been able to do in his postseason career so far?

BRIAN SNITKER: He’s been awesome. Like I said, the kid is so mature. But we got a lot of three-ball counts. The biggest credit to Ian is he never stops trying to make pitches, making pitches. He never gives in. He stays with his stuff. He stays with the game plan. If it doesn’t work, he goes to the next hitter and starts anew.

He’s got a really good quality of limiting damage when he’s not real sharp. I don’t know, it’s just we had all our guys gassed up today. I kind of liked how it set up after — and I think too in the postseason — we hadn’t scored any runs either. So he’s one mistake away from a really good outing going awry honestly, which against this lineup is really easy to happen.

So I just kind of felt that he got us to a really good point in the game.

Q. When you go through this game, do you have to just forget about the fact there’s two bullpen games coming and just focus on this one?

BRIAN SNITKER: No, I was all about winning today, and we’ll deal with tomorrow tomorrow. It is, we’re going to have to use a lot of the other guys, and that’s just — hopefully, we score more runs.

Q. Do you have a pitcher for tomorrow?

BRIAN SNITKER: We’re still talking. It’s going to be an opener. We’re not sure. Right now we’re still, as things get rushed through, talking about who that’s going to be. But we’ll have one here shortly.

Q. Now that you’ve experienced it, what was your first World Series experience like at Truist Park, and how special was it when they honored Hank Aaron?

BRIAN SNITKER: It was awesome. It was everything I thought it would be. The fans were unbelievable. I’m sure outside in The Battery everything was just crazy. No, it was really cool. Really cool. I thought — you know, I got to hug Billye, you know, and (pausing) tell her how much I missed Hank.

Q. I’m wondering, you have an important job, obviously, which is to try to win this game, number one. Do you ever think about the game or about history or what might be most entertaining, or are you so focused on a singular event, I need to win a baseball game?

BRIAN SNITKER: I need to win a baseball game. I don’t see a lot of stuff. Over the course of my career, my wife is, “You see this, you see that?” I was like, “No.” You just get so locked in on the game itself, and you don’t see things because there’s just so much going on in the course of the game.

Q. All the reasons you stated about pulling him are perfectly logical. But it still has never really happened, I don’t think, a pitcher being pulled from a no-hitter in the World Series when he’s healthy. Are those kind of decisions something you’ve evolved into over time? Because it’s probably not something we would have seen —

BRIAN SNITKER: No, that’s a good question, and you’re probably right. The me of old, probably a couple years ago, would be how the hell am I doing this, quite honestly? But the pitch count was such that he wasn’t going nine innings. So it wasn’t about that.

I’ve had that happen to me a few times during the regular season where you let guys go. He wasn’t going to throw a no-hitter himself. It was going to be a combined no-hitter if he did it. He probably only had one more inning in him after we took him out.

Q. You guys have not lost a game at Truist Park this postseason. What is it about this ballpark this year in the postseason?

BRIAN SNITKER: The guys like playing here. I mean, they do. Guys ask me during the season, how come you win on the road and you don’t win at home and vice versa? I don’t know what it is. I know the guys like playing here. They like being at home. They like our atmosphere. Just everything internally. Our fans are awesome.

I keep saying it and saying it, this Braves Country thing is real. It is so good, and our players love it, appreciate it, and it’s a real thing how these people come out and support this club. And they do feed off of it. I’m sorry, they feed off of it.

Q. Brian, what was your view on the Diaz hit? Did you think Rosario could have gotten to it? What was the reaction in the dugout?

BRIAN SNITKER: I hadn’t seen it. I’ll be honest with you, I was sitting back in the dugout, which I normally don’t, just because of the elements, and I haven’t seen a replay or whatever. I know it was probably one of those in between type things.

I’m going to tell you what, to the players’ credit, it is hard to hear. It is so loud, and it’s hard to hear. That’s one of those plays where you practice, if you’ve got someone that can work the pitching machine really good to do that play, when we do pop-up priorities in Spring Training, that’s a big play that we do so we don’t have wrecks and guys take command of that.

But in these circumstances, anything can happen because guys can’t hear each other.

Q. Was there a reaction in the dugout, or was it just tying run’s on base now?

BRIAN SNITKER: Yeah, I reacted. I don’t know, I just reacted. Number one, I didn’t care about a no-hitter. I just care about the tie run getting on. It happens. It’s a tough play right there.FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

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