Noah Syndergaard has torn UCL and will have Tommy John surgery — HardballTalk | NBC Sports

There’s no baseball, but there’s still bad news for the New York Mets

Noah Syndergaard has torn UCL and will have Tommy John surgery — HardballTalk | NBC Sports.

Mets ace Noah Syndergaard has a torn UCL and will likely undergo Tommy John surgery. The procedure will keep him out until at earliest April 2021 and likely into the summer months.

Mets General Manager Brodie Van Wagenen said moments ago that Syndergaard experienced the discomfort in his elbow before Spring Training was suspended and that he had, quietly, been getting examinations and second opinions. He also said that Syndergaard will have the surgery on Thursday at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Which is a bit odd given that elective surgeries are currently prohibited in New York under governor’s orders due to the pandemic, but I suppose whether this is “elective” is a matter of nuance. It would be for you or me, but maybe not for a professional athlete. Just throw that onto the pile of things about which we are uncertain in the current situation.

Syndergaard, who is under team control through 2021, had a down year in 2019, posting a 4.28 ERA, but his peripherals were still strong. There was speculation last season and heading into this past offseason that the team would trade him, but the club shot those rumors down and said they had no intention of dealing him.

Now, no matter their intentions, he is not an option available to them for any reason at all for over a year.

In court filings, Astros claim they sincerely apologized for cheating — HardballTalk | NBC Sports

The Astros suggest they sincerely apologized for their sign-stealing operation in recent court filings. They are being sued by some season-ticket holders.

In court filings, Astros claim they sincerely apologized for cheating — HardballTalk | NBC Sports

By Bill BaerMar 23, 2020, 9:04 PM EDT2 Comments

The Athletic’s Daniel Kaplan reports that, in recent court filings pertaining to a lawsuit filed against the team, the Astros claim they sincerely apologized for their elaborate sign-stealing operation. It is the team’s first official response to the litigation.

Astros lawyers wrote, “The ‘sign-stealing’ controversy has been a source of great disappointment to Astros fans as well as to the Astros organization. On several occasions, members of the Astros organization – including individual players and its Owner, Jim Crane – have expressed their sincere apologies and remorse for the events described in the report by the Commissioner of Major League Baseball.”

Crane didn’t really apologize. At a press conference last month, Crane said, “Our opinion is this didn’t impact the game. We had a good team. We won the World Series and we’ll leave it at that.”

In extremely brief statements to the media, both Alex Bregman and José Altuve spoke in the passive voice in an attempt to shirk responsibility. As if the whole cheating scheme was something that just happened to occur as opposed to being a concerted effort by players that went unchecked by several levels of management.

The Astros have a history of not apologizing when caught with their pants around their ankles. When they have had their arm twisted into giving an apology, their apologies have been weak. Consider that it took the Astros nearly a week to rescind a statement in which it accused Sports Illustrated journalist Stephanie Apstein of a “misleading and completely irresponsible” report about then-assistant GM Brandon Taubman taunting female reporters about Roberto Osuna — arrested for domestic violence in 2018 — when the Astros defeated the Yankees in the ALCS. The report turned out to be entirely accurate and Taubman was fired not long thereafter.

An apology should be heartfelt, acknowledge the bad behavior as well as those negatively impacted by it, and state what corrected actions will be taken in the future. None of the Astros’ apologies — if you can call them that — for any of their nefarious behavior in recent years, has passed muster.

Don’t just take my word for it, though. After hearing Crane, Bregman, and Altuve last month, Cubs third baseman Kris Bryant said, “There’s no sincerity, there’s no genuineness when it comes to it.”

Alex Rodriguez, who was wrapped up in a cheating scandal of his own back in 2013-14, acknowledged on ESPN during a spring training telecast that he handled his situation poorly. He offered the Astros an opportunity to learn from his mistakes, saying, “People want to see remorse, they want a real, authentic apology, and they have not received that thus far.”

This is all mostly immaterial as the lawsuit is about whether or not the Astros owe season ticket holders recompense. That being said, the Astros wanting official credit for apologizing is to want credit for doing the absolute bare minimum. And they didn’t even do that well, if one can say they did it at all.

VA Hero Of The Week: Jonathan Isaac Leading Coronavirus Relief Efforts — NESN.com

Orlando Magic forward Jonathan Isaac is stepping up in a big way. The 22-year-old is leading a relief effort to help feed children in the city of Orlando who are at risk of going hungry with school cancellations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That is why Isaac is our VA Hero of the Week, proudly…

VA Hero Of The Week: Jonathan Isaac Leading Coronavirus Relief Efforts — NESN.com

Cubs, Pirates Players Donate Food To Hospital Workers Facing COVID-19 — NESN.com

Major League Baseball currently is on hold due to the COVID-19 outbreak, and players are finding ways to give back to those on the front line. Pittsburgh Pirates players had more than 400 pizzas (and a bunch of pasta) delivered to Allegheny General Hospital on Monday, per MLB.com’s Adam Berry. It’s unclear which players contributed…

Cubs, Pirates Players Donate Food To Hospital Workers Facing COVID-19 — NESN.com

Major League Baseball currently is on hold due to the COVID-19 outbreak, and players are finding ways to give back to those on the front line. Pittsburgh Pirates players had more than 400 pizzas (and a bunch of pasta) delivered to Allegheny General Hospital on Monday, per MLB.com’s Adam Berry. It’s unclear which players contributed to the cause, but their goal was simple. “We thought this was a way to help. Two birds with one stone,” Pirates player rep Jameson Taillon said Monday, per Berry. “We can help local restaurants. We can help the hospitals and the workers and show our appreciation. We started throwing the idea around, and everyone got excited and made it happen.” Meanwhile, Chicago Cubs star Anthony Rizzo and his foundation supplied 150 meals to staff and patients at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital in Hollywood, Fla. on Monday. Read more at: https://nesn.com/2020/03/cubs-pirates-players-donate-food-to-hospital-workers-facing-covid-19/ Read more at: https://nesn.com/2020/03/cubs-pirates-players-donate-food-to-hospital-workers-facing-covid-19/ Read more at: https://nesn.com/2020/03/cubs-pirates-players-donate-food-to-hospital-workers-facing-covid-19/

Read more at: https://nesn.com/2020/03/cubs-pirates-players-donate-food-to-hospital-workers-facing-covid-19/