Key Words: President Mark Cuban? The billionaire isn’t ruling out entering the 2020 race — VOICE OF THE HWY

“ ‘I never would have considered it prior to a month ago, but now things are changing rapidly and dramatically… I’m not saying no, but it’s not something I’m actively pursuing. I’m just keeping the door open… You just don’t know what can happen between now and November.’ ” That’s billionaire Mark Cuban, leaving the […]

Key Words: President Mark Cuban? The billionaire isn’t ruling out entering the 2020 race — VOICE OF THE HWY

Here’s Who ESPN Analysts Have As Favorite For NBA H-O-R-S-E Competition — NESN.com

Trae Young has showed his shooting prowess during each of his first two NBA seasons. Now, the Atlanta Hawks guard is the favorite to win the league’s H-O-R-S-E Tournament — at least according to 18 different basketball analysts at ESPN. Notably, all 18 voters believe Young will make the finals in the playground-like tournament while…

Here’s Who ESPN Analysts Have As Favorite For NBA H-O-R-S-E Competition — NESN.com

Jackie Bradley Jr., Wife Erin Helping Homeless Population Amid Pandemic — NESN.com

Jackie Bradley Jr. and his wife, Erin, are joining the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, but doing so in their own way. Spearheaded by Erin, the Bradley family is donating to help the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, as the Boston Herald’s Jason Mastrodonato reported Friday. “There are so many different storylines to their…

Jackie Bradley Jr., Wife Erin Helping Homeless Population Amid Pandemic — NESN.com

Jackie Bradley Jr. and his wife, Erin, are joining the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, but doing so in their own way. Spearheaded by Erin, the Bradley family is donating to help the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, as the Boston Herald’s Jason Mastrodonato reported Friday. “There are so many different storylines to their lives,” Erin told the Herald. “Because of that, they deserve a chance and deserve support. Whether that means volunteering to hand out food at shelters or a financial donation or just being there to chat to them, I think they’re people like us. It can happen to anybody. The more you sit and talk to them, you realize it can happen.” The Bradleys have donated to the program before, but this act of kindness shows even though JBJ may not be helping the Red Sox on the diamond, his family still wants to help their Boston community. “I think it’s good for fans to see that while we’re here for baseball and it’s our husbands’ jobs, we do become a part of the community, too,” Erin said. “Our daughter, Emerson, was born in Boston, which may not be a forever home for us, but will always hold a really special spot in our hearts.” Jackie Bradley Jr. is now among the longest tenured Red Sox players, having played in Boston since 2013. Notably, the Bradley family joins many Boston athletes including Jackie’s former college friend and fellow Boston sports star, Stephon Gilmore, who announced he would be helping against the virus by donating to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Boston. Of course, the two are not the only ones doing their part during the uncertain times as many athletes are pitching in.

Read more at: https://nesn.com/2020/04/erin-bradley-jackie-bradley-jr-s-wife-helping-homeless-amid-pandemic/

Should baseball come back this year? — HardballTalk | NBC Sports

The plans to resume play at some point this year feel hollow and callous.

Should baseball come back this year? — HardballTalk | NBC Sports
This is a time of year typically spent with family. Many of us are celebrating Easter today. Many others have been celebrating Passover since Thursday. Whether it be a big Easter dinner or a Seder, or for any other holiday or occasion for that matter, we like to come together as family. Family is important.
That’s one of the many reasons that the various contingency plans being floated by MLB to resume the season in some capacity this year are bothering me. Whether it be the total lockdown in Arizona or playing out the season by continuing the Grapefruit and Cactus Leagues, resumption of play would hinge on the players, coaches and all imaginable support staff would need to be stringently monitored and quarantined. There would need to be regular testing, daily (if not more often) temperature-taking, constant disinfection of all surfaces, and social distancing at all possible times. The Arizona plan outright calls for players to be separated from their families.
That’s no way to live. The players would be treated like livestock or robots, not like people. It’s putting profit before common sense. There would need to be a small army of supporting workers (drivers, trainers, doctors, cooks, nutritionists, etc.) who would deserve the exact same level of care. Those workers would deserve a level of pay that would be appropriate for putting their lives in harm’s way.
Stephanie Apstein of Sports Illustrated laid out all the problems better than I ever could. There are too many hurdles, too many loose ends, too many little cruelties.
We keep hearing of baseball as a potential great healing factor. We keep being reminded of how Franklin Roosevelt made sure that baseball continued on through World War II as a way to enrich the lives of the people who were supporting the war effort at home. Surely there could be a way for baseball and all the other sports to take on that same healing role, no?
This isn’t a war. It’s a pandemic. Its battles are being fought not with guns and bombs, but with ventilators and test kits. The people on the front lines have far too little ammunition. Though we have something of an idea of the scope of the pandemic within America’s borders, we cannot know for sure just how bad things are without widespread testing. We can’t possibly expect that a large stockpile of test kits be set aside for the purpose of letting a private non-essential business operate.
Moreover, having the league operate feels morally ambiguous at best. Yes, play would resume when the CDC gives MLB the green light. That would theoretically come at a time when the spread of the virus has been contained and minimized. But just because the curve on the graph has trended downward for a long enough period doesn’t mean that there still won’t be healing to be done.
Yes, having baseball on the television again would be a welcome relief. But spending money and valuable resources on that and not on helping families in need would be misguided and greedy. Millions of Americans are out of work, and that number will only go up. So too will the number of families who have lost loved ones to COVID-19.
Creating a sanitary and safe environment to play the game before the full scale implementation of a vaccine is going to be incredibly expensive. Baseball is a business and America is a capitalist society, but surely we can all agree that our desire to see our favorite players in action again comes second to looking out for each other and giving aid to those who have seen their very existences torn asunder.
Many of the players themselves have expressed distaste for these proposals. Nationals closer Sean Doolittle and his wife Erieann Dolan gave some wonderfully insightful thoughts on the matter to The Daily Beast. Phillies starter Zack Wheeler said he would refuse to miss the birth of his first child in three months’ time.
We probably won’t have a vaccine until 12-18 months from now. Just one positive test, whether it be a player, coach, trainer or hotel worker who catches the virus, would render the entire quarantine league moot.
The idea of trying to play baseball under these circumstances, even in an all-too distant future where even just a trickle of normalcy has returned to our lives, makes my skin crawl. People are dying. People are having their livelihoods wiped away. Families are grieving. Risking more workers to exposure and using up resources just for the sake of sports feels pointless.
The moment we are all living in right now is bigger than all of us, bigger than any sport or any league. We have a duty as a people to treat it that way. It’s perfectly normal to seek a distraction, to want to feel as if the world isn’t on fire. And it’s in fact healthy to do so. You shouldn’t be constantly subjecting yourself to the horrors of our reality if you can avoid doing so.
That doesn’t mean that it would be okay for baseball to try to bring itself back this way. Our desire to watch sports doesn’t mean a damn thing right now. What matters is safety and health. What matters is getting help to those who need it.
Be well. Be safe. Give your families your love. Baseball can wait until a vaccine is ready.
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Suns’ Devin Booker wins NBA 2K20 Players Tournament, Clippers duo out in semis — Daily News

Devin Booker won the NBA 2K20 Players Tournament on Saturday night, sweeping Phoenix Suns teammate Deandre Ayton in the best-of-three final. “I played a lot growing up,” Booker said. “It’s all about timing and eye coordination.” ESPN broadcast the three-day, 16-player Xbox One competition. The last NBA games were played March 11, the day Utah…

Suns’ Devin Booker wins NBA 2K20 Players Tournament, Clippers duo out in semis — Daily News

The NBA wants to finish this season. These medical experts know how that can happen —

Potential “immunity certificates” and increased testing nationwide could create a clearer picture of the NBA’s likelihood of finishing this season.

The NBA wants to finish this season. These medical experts know how that can happen —